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From global to local: vector-borne disease in an interconnected world

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Suk, J. E., Semenza, J. C.



Green space and changes in self-rated health among people with chronic illness

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Wolfe, M. K., Groenewegen, P. P., Rijken, M., de Vries, S.


This prospective study analyses change in self-rated health of chronically ill people in relation to green space in their living environment at baseline. Data on 1112 people in the Netherlands with one or more medically diagnosed chronic disease(s) were used. The percentage of green space was calculated for postal code area. Multilevel linear regression analysis was conducted. We found no relationship between green space and change in health; however, an unexpected relationship between social capital at baseline and health change was discovered.


Health-related quality of life and risk factor control: the importance of educational level in prevention of cardiovascular diseases

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Ose, D., Rochon, J., Campbell, S. M., Wensing, M., Freund, T...


Background: This study aimed to describe and to analyse the importance of educational level for controlled risk factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods: This observational study was conducted in nine European countries (5632 patients in 249 practices). We compared patients with a low level of education (up to 9 years) with patients with a high level of education (>9 years), with regard to controlled cardiovascular disease risk factors and HRQoL. A multilevel approach was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients with a low level of education were older (P < 0.001), more often female (P < 0.001), more often single (P < 0.001) and had a higher number of other conditions (e.g. heart failure) (P < 0.001). Significant differences in terms of controlled risk factors were revealed for blood pressure (RR) ≤140/90 mmHg (P = 0.039) and the sum of controlled risk factors (P = 0.027). Higher age, lower education, female gender, living as single, patient group (coronary heart disease patients) and the number of other conditions were negatively associated with HRQoL. A higher sum of controlled risk factors were positively associated with higher HRQoL in the whole sample (r = 0.0086, P < 0.001) as well as in both educational-level groups (r = 0.0075, P = 0.038 in the low-level group and r = 0.0082, P = 0.001 in the high-level group). Conclusion: Patients with a lower educational level were more often females, singles, had a higher number of other conditions, a higher number of uncontrolled risk factors and a lower HRQoL. However, the higher the control of risk factors was, the higher the HRQoL was overall as well as in both educational-level groups.


E-cigarettes: threat or opportunity?

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Gilmore, A. B., Hartwell, G.



Public health leadership and electronic cigarette users

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Stimson, G. V.



Heat-related thermal sensation, comfort and symptoms in a northern population: the National FINRISK 2007 study

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Nayha, S., Rintamaki, H., Donaldson, G., Hassi, J., Jousilah...


Background: The occurrence of subjective symptoms related to heat strain in the general population is unknown. The present study aimed to describe the temperatures considered to be comfortable or hot and the prevalence of heat-related complaints and symptoms in the Finnish population. Methods: Four thousand and seven men and women aged 25–74 years, participants of the National FINRISK 2007 study, answered a questionnaire inquiring about the ambient temperatures considered to be hot and the upper limit of comfortable and about heat-related complaints and symptoms. The age trends in threshold temperatures and symptom prevalence were examined in 1-year groups by gender after smoothing with loess regression. The prevalence estimates were also adjusted for age. Results: The temperature considered as hot averaged 26°C and the upper limit for thermal comfort was 22°C. Both temperatures declined with age (from 25 to 74 years) by 1–5°C. Approximately 80% of the subjects reported signs or symptoms of heat strain in warm weather, mostly thirst (68%), drying of mouth (43%), impaired endurance (43%) and sleep disturbances (32%). Cardiac and respiratory symptoms were reported by 6 and 7%, respectively, and their prevalence increased up to the age of 75 years. The exception was thirst, whose prevalence declined with age. Most symptoms and complaints were more prevalent in women than men. Conclusions: A large percentage of this northern European population suffers from heat-related complaints. Information on these is an aid in assessing the burden of summer heat on population health and is a prerequisite for any rational planning of pre-emptive measures.


E-cigarettes: does the new emperor of tobacco harm reduction have any clothes?

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Chapman, S.



Cross-national comparisons of sickness absence systems and statistics: towards common indicators

Date

Source

25.07.2014

Gimeno, D., Bultmann, U., Benavides, F. G., Alexanderson, K....


We aimed to identify common elements in work sickness absence (SA) in Spain, Sweden and The Netherlands. We estimated basic statistics on benefits eligibility, SA incidence and duration and distribution by major diagnostics. The three countries offer SA benefits for at least 12 months and wage replacement, differing in who and when the payer assumes responsibility; the national health systems provide health care with participation from occupational health services. Episodes per 1000 salaried workers and episode duration varied by country; their distribution by diagnostic was similar. Basic and useful SA indicators can be constructed to facilitate cross-country comparisons.


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